Florida Southern College has the nation's only bachelor's degree program in citrus taught by industry leaders.

Our citrus program—the only one of its kind in the country—provides the perfect combination of hands-on experiences (both on campus and off) and broad-based education, as well as the industry connections, you need to excel in it.

TOP REASON TO CHOOSE FSC FOR CITRUS

  • We have the nation’s only bachelor's degree program specifically in citrus.
  • FSC is known throughout Florida's citrus industry for the quality of our program.
  • The FSC campus has a collection of citrus trees for use in classes.
  • With the preparation they receive here, our students excel in graduate programs.
  • Our location in Florida's citrus production area and our closeness to the Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred allow us to do excellent field trips and to bring in expert guest speakers from the industry.

Engaged Learning in the Classroom

As a citrus major, all of your courses include engaged learning such as labs, field trips, and guest speakers, etc. You’ll also gain experience in planting, irrigating, weed management, pruning, fertilizers, pest identification and management, and other aspects of tree management working with our on-campus collection of many varieties of citrus trees.

Internship Sites

Our students intern with large citrus production companies, grove service companies, agricultural cooperatives, juice processing plants, agrichemical and fertilizer companies, or at citrus research facilities. We’ll shape the intern to match your area of interest.

Recent internship sites include:

  • Ben Hill Griffin, Inc
  • Haines City Citrus Growers Association
  • University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center
  • Syngenta Corporation
  • Florida’s Natural

Departmental Clubs & Organizations

Alpha Gamma Rho, the national agricultural social/professional fraternity, and Sigma Alpha, the national agricultural professional sorority, are both active on campus.

Scholarships & Financial Aid

With the largest number of endowed scholarships of any department on campus, we give more than $80,000 per year in awards to our majors.

 Download Application Today!

Career Opportunities

Most of our majors become citrus grove managers, citrus consultants, and researchers in the citrus industry. A significant number also pursue graduate degrees from such institutions as the University of Florida and the University of California, Berkeley. You’ll find FSC graduates at:

  • US Department of Agriculture
  • Florida Department of Agriculture
  • Haines City Citrus Growers Association
  • Ben Hill Griffin, Inc.
  • Smoak Groves
  • Tree Source Citrus Nursery

Start the Conversation
and Contact…

Dr. Malcolm M. Manners
John and Ruth Tyndall Professor of Citrus Science and Department Chair
863.680.4337
mmanners@flsouthern.edu

Interested In Majoring In Citrus?

Scholarships are available

 Download Application Today!



 

Program Requirements

Citrus Major Requirements

A. General Education Requirements 40 hours
B. Major Requirements 63 hours
BIO 2235 General Botany
BIO 4150 Plant Physiology
BUS 3160 Marketing Principles
CHE 1011 Chemical Foundations of the Biological Sciences I and
CHE 1015 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry and
CHE 1017 Introduction to Chemical Analysis
or  
CHE 1111 Principles of Chemistry I and
CHE 1112 Principles of Chemistry II
CIT 3301 Introduction to Citrus
CIT 3302 Citrus Grove Management
CIT 3313 Citrus Postharvest Practices
CIT 4303 Citrus Pest and Disease Management
CIT 4999 Citrus Production and Business Practices
ECO 2205 Principles of Microeconomics
or  
ECO 2207 Principles of Macroeconomics
HRT 2100 Introduction to Horticultural Science
HRT 3301 Soil Science
HRT 3302 Plant Nutrition
HRT 4955 Career Development Skills for Internship
HRT 4960 Internship
or  
HRT 4961 Internship

One of the following courses:

HRT 3325 Principles of Turf Management
HRT 3326 Tropical and Temperate Fruits
HRT 4320 Special Topics in Horticulture
LND 4999 Nursery Design and Management
C. Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 12 hours
D. Electives 9 hours
E. Total 124 hours

For a complete listing of requirements, please refer to the
Academic Catalog  

Minoring in Horticultural Science

To earn a minor in horticultural science, you will need successfully complete HRT 2100 along with sixteen additional hours selected from CIT, HRT, and LND.

 

Course Descriptions

Biology

BIO 2235 GENERAL BOTANY
Four hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1500 or HRT 2100 or permission of the instructor. The flowering plant, major plant groups, metabolism, genetics, ecology, and economic botany.

BIO 4150 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Four hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2235 and either CHE 1011 or 1111, or permission of the instructor. Photosynthesis, respiration, and other metabolic processes, growth, and water relationships in vascular plants. Engaged learning activities include group work on demonstrations of concepts discussed in class as well as group work on multi-week experiments on which graded reports will be written.

Chemistry

CHE 1011 CHEMICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES I
Four hours. A review and study of chemical concepts that includes atomic structure, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, acidity and basicity and oxidation-reduction reactions. The laboratory portion will contain experiments that reinforce the principles introduced in the classroom. Gen Ed: NW

CHE 1015 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Two hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1101. A study of organic compounds that includes structure, properties, and reactions of functional groups followed by an examination of the role these molecules play in biological structures and processes. Concepts presented correlate areas such as environmental science, ecology, agricultural chemistry, marine chemistry and biochemistry. Coursework includes active learning exercises, collaborative problem solving, discovery based experiments, team projects, and peer instruction.

CHE 1017 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ANALYSIS
Two hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1101. Introductory principles for chemical analysis will be covered with an emphasis on quantitative measurements and data analysis. Topics may include acidbase and equilibrium chemistry, volumetric analyses, spectrophotometry, and electrochemical methods of chemical analysis with a particular emphasis on analyses relevant to environmental and agricultural systems. Theoretical aspects of these topics will be addressed in the classroom, and practical aspects of these topics will be explored in the laboratory.

CHE 1111 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I
Four hours. Prerequisite: High school chemistry, CHE 1000 or CHE 1011. Quantitative treatment of the principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, states of matter, energy, atomic structure, periodicity, ionic compounds, and molecular structure. Gen Ed: NW

CHE 1112 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1111. The topics covered in this course will include: intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, acid, bases, buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and introduction to basic organic chemistry. Gen Ed: NW

Citrus

CIT 3301 INTRODUCTION TO CITRUS
Four hours. Pre- or co-requisite: HRT 2100 or permission of the instructor. This is the introductory course in citrus production. It discusses the botany of citrus, its varieties, and rootstocks, soils suitable for citrus and development of a young citrus grove, as well as Florida hydrology and meteorology and their effects on water availability for citrus production.

CIT 3302 CITRUS GROVE MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisite: CIT 3301 or permission of the instructor. This course is the logical continuation of CIT 3301. It includes discussion of commercial citrus production methods, such as frost protection, nutrient requirements, citrus pests, irrigation, cultivation and weed management, and rehabilitation of bearing citrus groves of all major varieties.

CIT 3313 CITRUS POSTHARVEST PRACTICES
Four hours. Prerequisite: CIT 3301 or permission of the instructor. This course is an examination of the operations and technology involved in citrus processing (juice) plants and citrus by-products. It also includes the physiology of citrus fruits, packinghouse operations for fresh fruit varieties, postharvest diseases and disorders, and legal maturity tests and standards.

CIT 4303 CITRUS PEST AND DISEASE MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisite: CIT 3301 or permission of the instructor. This course examines the insects, mites, and nematodes affecting citrus, as well as the fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases of the crop. It considers biological, cultural, and chemical controls, planning spray programs, as well as pesticide safety and “best management practices.”

CIT 4999 CITRUS PRODUCTION AND BUSINESS PRACTICES
Four hours. Prerequisites: CIT 3302 and 4303 and HRT 3302, or permission of the instructor, and successful completion of coursework that satisfies Effective Communication SLOs A and B. This is the capstone course for the Citrus major. The objective will be to develop a full production plan for a commercial citrus operation in Florida, using knowledge from all of the other courses offered in the departmental curriculum. Gen Ed: EC-C

Economics

ECO 2205 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
Four hours. Consumer behavior and aggregation to markets, producer behavior, theory of the firm, and aggregation to markets analysis: production and pricing of goods, factors of production and their attendant input markets and distribution of output, elasticities and incidence of a tax. Gen Ed: Qn

ECO 2207 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
Four hours. National income and product accounts; theory of aggregate supply and demand, employment, consumption, investment, price level, economic growth, money, currency exchange, the Federal Reserve, interest rates, and comparative economic systems. Gen Ed: Qn

Horticulture

HRT 1000 PLANTS AND SOCIETY
Four hours. Does not count toward the major or minor. This course examines plant biology and function as they apply to human use. It considers the role of modern agriculture in nutrition and health. Specific crops are discussed as they relate historically and for the future to hunger, poverty, and economics. Gen Ed: SW (Glb, Aw, An), NW

HRT 2100 INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE
Four hours. This is the introductory course to all of the horticulture-related majors. It considers the fundamental principles and practices underlying the propagation and growing of horticultural crops. This course fulfills the Natural World student learning outcome and will empower students to develop an understanding of the scientific investigation of the natural world. Gen Ed: NW

HRT 3301 SOIL SCIENCE
Four hours. Prerequisite: CHE 1011 or 1111. This course considers the soil as a natural body including its chemical and physical properties, tillage, water management, organic matter, ecology, and principles of soil conservation. Florida soils and horticultural crops are emphasized.

HRT 3302 PLANT NUTRITION
Four hours. Same as BIO 3302. Prerequisites: HRT 3301 and either BIO 2235 or HRT 2100. This course deals with the relationship of plants to soil in their acquisition of the mineral nutrients needed for life. Students will examine the chemical and physical properties of plant mineral nutrients, their reactions in the soil, and how the plant absorbs, transports, modifies, stores, and utilizes them. There will be an emphasis on Florida soils and crops.

HRT 3325 PRINCIPLES OF TURF MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisite: HRT 2100 or permission of the instructor. This course considers turfgrasses for recreational and landscape use, including their growth characteristics and methods of propagation. Basic management requirements, including control of important pest, disease, and weed problems are discussed. Questions of water management and turf irrigation, including water quality and availability, will also be examined.

HRT 3326 TROPICAL AND TEMPERATE FRUITS
Four hours. Prerequisite: HRT 2100 or permission of the instructor. This course discusses fruit crops, other than citrus, that can be grown in Florida, from the standpoint of commercial production, as well as use in the home garden. The flowering and fruiting physiology, water and weed management, pest management and other aspects of their culture will be studied.

HRT 4320 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HORTICULTURE
Four hours. Prerequisite: HRT 2100 or permission of the instructor. This course will discuss specialized topics of one or more related aspects of horticulture. The course may be taken more than once.

HRT 4960 INTERNSHIP
Three hours. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status or departmental permission. This course applies horticultural theory and business in an operational setting, with supervision by cooperating practitioner and faculty. A one-semester-hour portion during the semester teaches career development skills. A two-semester-hour field experience is then completed, usually the following summer.

HRT 4961 INTERNSHIP
Three hours. Prerequisites: HRT 4960. This course applies horticultural theory and business in an operational setting, with supervision by cooperating practitioner and instructor.

Landscape Horticulture

LND 4999 NURSERY DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT
Four hours. Prerequisites: LND 3316 or permission of the instructor and successful completion of coursework that satisfies Effective Communication SLOs A and B. This is the capstone course for the Landscape Horticulture major. It is a project-oriented discussion of commercial field- and container-grown nursery design and operation, cultural practices and crop scheduling, nursery management and financial planning. Field trips are required. Gen Ed: EC-C